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10 Questions With Bonsaw Brewing Company’s Brewmaster A.J. Stoll!

We finally made it to Bonesaw Brewing Company in Glassboro, N.J. to do our “10 Questions with the Brewer” Brewmaster AJ Stoll. If you are like us, you have been following construction of this Brewery over the last year or so. Bonesaw was one of the first breweries in our area to be built from the ground up and we were curious about what it would look like, and more importantly how good the beer would be. From the moment you pull into the parking lot, to entering into the massive taproom, to the first sip of beer, one word comes to mind:  Craftsmanship. What Dr. Rich DeVerniero, and brother-in laws David & Allen Doe, and Brewmaster AJ Stoll have created is a total sensory overload. From the custom light fixtures crafted by Dr. Rich himself to the impressive live edge bar, and wood work done by Randy P. Goodman of Random 8 Woodworks. All 4 owners were heavily involved with every single phase of construction. Bonesaw Brewing consists of a 17 BBL (20HL) brewhouse with 10-50 BBL (60HL) fermenters and 2-50 BBL (60HL) Brite tanks. He also has a few freshly filled barrels that I can’t wait to try.

Brewmaster AJ Stoll took the long way to get to N.J… He is originally from Orange County, California, where his brewing journey started at Seven Bridges Organic Homebrew Supply in Santa Cruz. AJ got the bug early, and the supply store gave him a way to stay in touch with it (Plus the discounts didn’t hurt either). While at Seven Bridges he actually worked with Tim Clifford and Jason Hansen who went on to open Santé Adairius Rustic Ales in 2012, and are really making some great beers. After college, AJ got an assistant brewer job with Seabright Brewery. After a short stint there, he moved on to his first Head Brewer job at Ukiah Brewing Co. From there he moved to Figueroa Mountain Brewing where his Imperial IPA Lizard’s Mouth was nominated for best new beer in 2014. Along with dozens of awards he helped Figueroa grow from 1,200 BBL to 20,000 BBL per year in production. 

Later on in 2014 AJ got the opportunity to go to Kerry, Ireland where he helped start-up Killarney Brewing Company which has become well-respected in the beer world. Although AJ joked that it only rains twice for 6 months at a time he was taken by the beauty, and the 40 shades of green. Something else that was surprising to him was that most of the 10,000 BBL they produced sold in just a 10 mile radius which confirms that the Irish love their beer. 

The time at Killarney lasted about a year, and it was time for AJ to come back to the states. In 2015 he found himself at Funky Buddha in Florida where he helped get their Brewhouse in order before it was sold to Constellation Brands. Then like the song say’s, I’m going back to Cali. When he got back to California he started working as a consultant with the plan to work with as many different breweries of all sizes to absorb as much experience as he could. He helped start new breweries, and helped tweak existing ones until he got the call to be the Brewmaster at Bonesaw.

1. What was the first beer you brewed, and how was it? 

It was an all grain Belgium double kit which I brewed twice before I wrote my own recipe for a Maple Buckwheat Brown Ale, and my love for brewing spiraled out of control from there. The first batch didn’t come out exactly like I hoped, but all the next ones came out good, and drinkable.

2. What is your favorite style to brew, and why?

I’m a chameleon when it comes to that. I like to brew darker beers because it makes the whole brewery smell good. Being from California I do love to brew IPA’s, but if I had to pick a favorite it would have to be Lagers. They are the hardest, and most transparent. If something goes wrong everyone knows it. I also like Pilsners for the same reason.

3. Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Rate Beer, and does it influence your recipes?

I do look at them from time to time just as a quality control check to see if there’s a problem. I’m really not looking to see if someone liked the beer, but more if they went into one of our accounts and got a beer that tasted funny. It does not affect my recipes at all. We have 16 beers on tap right now with all different styles, so if you can’t find something it may be you just don’t like beer.

4. How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

That’s one of my favorite things to do everywhere I’ve been is to use local ingredients. We use local honey for some of our beers as well as malts from Rabbit Hill Farms which has been a nice recurring theme to this question. Our peaches, and pumpkins are all local, and our coffee is roasted right in Pitman. It’s not just the freshness, and quality, but supporting local businesses that support us.

5. What is one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

Don’t be afraid to dump a batch and start over if you’re not happy with it. With all the books and internet it’s much easier to get it right the first time than it was 20 years ago.

6. What is the one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery?

Don’t assume that because you are a home brewer that you’re a brewer. I’m not saying you can’t make the leap to a 3 BBL system, but it would be a good idea to bring someone in who has big system experience. Try to get some professional schooling or an internship with a bigger brewery. Make sure it’s your passion.

7. If there was a beer you could brew with no regards to cost, production, or sales, what would it be?

I would probably brew a Triple IPA with some of the more expensive, and hard to get hops like Galaxy etc. I would also love to try an Ice Bock (Eisbock) which is where you freeze and remove a percentage of the water to increase the alcohol content, and turn it into a Triple Bock. I can’t legally do it in New Jersey because it’s distillation, but it would be pretty cool to do. A Stone Beer would be interesting to try also. It’s when you super heat rocks and put them in the kettle to get it to boil.

8. Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you?

How many people showed up to drink beer, and support us. We obviously wanted to be successful, and built this place for the consumer, but the response was very humbling. We only had 2 beers for the first 2 weeks, but the place was packed, and we were extremely grateful for it.

9. Other than your beer, what is your go to after a long day at the brewery?

I still love Yuengling. It was hard to get in California and Florida so it was a treat when I could get it.

10. Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

We are planning on growth of course. Our taproom is our most important thing right now, but we want to expand out with our accounts to more of New Jersey and Philadelphia. We also have plans for a second building in the back lot where we can not only make more beer, but more interesting beer. We just filled our first set of barrels which is something we want to continue to do more of. In 5 years we would love to build another Bonesaw probably in South Carolina somewhere. Rich, Dave, Allen, and I really enjoyed building this one, and our fingerprints are on almost everything in here. We are not the kind of guys to stand around with clipboards, and would love to do this again.

Bonus: What’s the best beer you ever had?

I have a couple ones. I would have to say a Rodenbach Grand Cru for sure. I had a 10 year vertical of Bigfoot Barleywine from Sierra Nevada that was really good. It’s also an experience that makes a beer the best one. If I really had to pick one it would be the Augustiner Helles’ Lager I had sitting in the Augustiner Beer Hall in Munich.

Bonus 2: What do you listen to when you’re brewing?

I have to have music playing when I’m brewing. I’m all over the place when it comes to music. The other day I listened to The Killers all day. Some days I listen to older country music, or I’ll get on a Peter Gabriel or Genesis kick. You can never go wrong with 80’s heavy metal either.

I would like to thank AJ, Rich, Dave, and Allen for being such gracious hosts, and taking time out of their day to sit down with me. One other thing I noticed was that the entire staff was extremely friendly and knowledgeable which was the cherry on top of the whole experience. Do yourself a favor and stop by if you’re in the area. They also have nitro cold brew coffee on tap as well as homemade sodas for you non beer people.

                        As Always

                     Enjoy Your Pour!

10 Questions With...

10 Questions With…Nick and Bert of Last Wave Brewing!

Days are getting shorter and nights are getting colder, but you can still hold on to that elusive endless summer at Last Wave Brewing Company, Point Pleasant Beach’s favorite craft brewery. Last Wave just finished up their second successful summer season and co-owners, Nick Jiorle, Bert Roling and wife Dani Roling continue to grow the business to keep up with the demand.    

“We went from 5 taps to 25 in a year.”, said brewer Nick Jiorle.  “We also will be getting a new mash tun in a couple of weeks that will enable us to double batch more efficiently and produce 3 – 4 more barrels per brew. 

I was able to catch up with Nick and his longtime brew partner Bert to ask our 10 Questions.

First Beer you brewed? How was it?

The first beer we made as home brewers was Red Sky, a red ale which is still on our tap list and is the original recipe.  So obviously it was pretty good!

Favorite style to brew and why? 

That’s hard to decide, we don’t like to put one beer over another.  I would say Spot Check Golden Ale. It is more challenging because there is nowhere to hide.  You can’t hide flaws so you really have to pay attention to the process. 

Do you look at rating on Untapped, Beer Advocate, Rate Beer and if you do how does it influence your recipes? 

We don’t really pay attention to it as far as influencing our recipes, but we do use it as a resource to see what some people think about them. We look for trends and don’t take it personal if someone says a beer is awful.   

How do you stay connected with the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

We’ve started using Port Coffee Roasters in Point Pleasant.  Nick doesn’t drink coffee but likes using it in their recipes.  Port Coffee Roasters website states that craft coffee roasting is a priority, so easy to see what the connection is.

One tip you would give to home brewers to make better beer? 

Temperature control! Particularly your fermentation temperature that is so important to the process. And write everything down! 

One piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery. 

Don’t have any other social obligations! Work on consistency. Perfect your craft, start with 3 or 4 beers and make them well.  Also, remember when you own a brewery, 25% is making beer….75% is everything else that goes along with being a business owner.

If there were a beer that you could brew, with no regard to cost, production or sales, what would it be? 

Definitely an Oktoberfest. We don’t have lagering capabilities right now, so that’s something we would like to do.  We also brewed a wee heavy called Winter Warmer, which was actually our highest rated beer on Untapped.  It would be great to produce it more often, but it is very expensive to brew, as it includes fresh maple syrup and pecans.  

From opening day forward, what surprised you the most? 

Every day brings new surprises!  Really, the biggest surprise has been how welcoming the other business owners and everyone else in town has been. We were welcomed with open arms from day one and that hasn’t changed! 

Other than your own brew, what’s your  go to drink after a long day at the brewery? 

After a long day at the brewery?  Nice cold water…you mean beer?  Whatever beer someone wants to bring us! 

Where do you see the brewery in one year…five years? 

We want to still be in Point Pleasant Beach, we love this town! We would also like to    continue to expand our reach and cover new markets. 

Bonus Question:  What music do your listen to when you are brewing? 

Wow, that’s tough. Wide range we could be listening to Jamiroquai one day, Modest Mouse, or Soundgarden.  

      

Eclectic music, eclectic beers…the Jersey Shore is beautiful in fall and winter so check out Last Wave!

10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Ingrid Epoch, Head Brewer of Tuckahoe Brewing Company

I recently sat down with the new Head Brewer of Tuckahoe Brewing Co. Ingrid Epoch to talk about her past, and present with Tuckahoe Brewing. Ingrid started out her professional brewing career with Devil’s Creek Brewing in Collingswood in the spring of 2016. In September of 2017, she brought her skills to Forgotten Boardwalk Brewing where she brewed until April of this year when she became Head Brewer of Tuckahoe Brewing Co. Although I only had a short time to interview Ingrid due to a rigorous brewing schedule, I got the impression that this is going to be a good fit. While she will continue to brew our favorite recipes we have enjoyed over the last 7 years, she will also bring in some new styles for us to enjoy. I’m really excited to see what the future holds for Tuckahoe Brewing. To learn a little more about Ingrid I asked her our 10 questions which is one of my favorite assignments because of the great tips and knowledge they produce.

What was the first beer you brewed, and how was it?

After reading “The Complete Joy of Home Brewing” by Charlie Papazian AKA “The Bible” to most homebrewers I knew I was going to love to brew. I started out more ambitious than most and made an all grain Barrel Aged Russian Imperial Stout. It had some off flavors and didn’t come out as I had hoped, but my friends liked it. They were not as experienced at the time with craft beer so they were not as critical as I was.

What is your favorite style to brew, and why?

Although I really love to brew Belgium beers there is such a broad range of answers to that question. I love brewing all the seasonal beers for the variety. I love a great Quad in the winter, and a good Saison in the summer, but my favorite time is fall when my first run of Stouts start to come out.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Rate Beer, and does it influence your recipes?

More than I really should. I don’t mean to sound pretentious, but I know what I want from my recipe better than someone who is reviewing it. In the end, I want to make beer that I like to drink, and it seems most people like to drink it as well. I do like it for legitimate concerns like bad draft lines, and if there is any out of date kegs floating around out there. The best piece of advice I got was to lose my Untapped account.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to ingredients?

Great question right at this time. We are using malts from Rabbit Hill Farms in a collaboration beer with Slack Tide Brewing that will be out soon. We try to get local hops to do small wet hop collaboration batches. Even more local I’m trying to grow hops on the side of the building. Of course, we are using some blueberries for a Saison that we are making, and we use local produce in the Firkins we do every 3rd Thursday.

What is one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

Get the right equipment to measure things properly. Do not rely on the old school eyeball method for anything. Although cleaning is the biggest part,  monitoring your recipes should not take a back seat. The one thing that helped me make the jump from a home brewer to a professional brewer was keeping good records. I have sheets that I write down every possible thing so I can consistently hit those marks every time. Repeatability is the difference between home brewing and professional brewing.

What is the one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery?

Save up twice as much money as you think you will need. Also, you need to realize you will need at least 6 months from the time you brew your first beer to the time you sell your first beer. What has become a common answer in New Jersey is be prepared to wait for permits, licenses, and whatever else comes up. Have your brand, know your brand, and understand it. There are a lot of great breweries making really good beer so you need to know how you’re going to sell it, and who you’re going to market it to. That needs to be part of your package from day one. The label on the outside is just as important as the beer on the inside.

If there was a beer you could brew with no regards to cost, production, or sales what would it be?

I would do a high ABV Scottish Export Stout, but barrel age it in Oloroso Sherry Barrels that they use for scotch. It would be a Scotch on Scotch. The barrels are extremely expensive, and the grain bill I have written up for it is prohibitively expensive too.

Looking back at your first day forward, what was the one thing that surprised you?

Having an insane amount of good, knowledgeable help was great. Everyone was so into the program I wanted to put into place. A lot of time when a brewer leaves everyone follows, but that wasn’t the case here.

Other than your beer, what is your go-to after a long day at the brewery?

Not to sound cliché for the area, but Tonewood’s Fuego. It’s so great, and I only live a couple blocks from the brewery so it’s easy to pop in and fill my growler.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

We want to double the capacity by adding 2 more 30 BBL fermenters, and 2 additional 30 BBL Brite Tanks. In 5 years I would love to see us distributing in all of New Jersey, in Philadelphia, and beyond. I want us to be in Delaware, and possibly the eastern shore of Maryland.

Bonus 1: What was the best beer you ever had?

 It was a Foudre Aged Sour Saison from Stone Brewing that I had at a dinner they hosted at The Blue Monkey in Merchantville.

Bonus 2: What do you listen to when you brew?

Almost always listen to 36 Chambers by Wu-Tang when I boil because the album is about an hour so it’s a mental focus thing since I know when the end is coming. Other than that we self DJ and someone puts on an album and we rock and roll.

Join us at South Jersey Beer Scene in welcoming Ingrid to Tuckahoe Brewing, and stop in to say hi, and have a beer. I’m really excited to try one of her recipes. 

And, As Always, Enjoy Your Pour!

                                       

10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Paul Simmons of Glasstown Brewing Company

Back in January when I sat down with Paul and Jen Simmons to talk about their upcoming 4 year anniversary I also did a “10 Questions with the Brewer” segment.  Paul is a really great guy and we talked for well over an hour, and I could have talked to him for another 10 more!  These articles are one of my favorite things we do here at South Jersey Beer Scene and Paul’s was no exception!  We get a lot of similar answers, but how they each got there is often times very different.  Glasstown will be having its 5th Annual Adult Easter Egg Hunt at the brewery on 3/31 at 11:45 AM.  Paul, Jen, and the rest of the staff at Glasstown hide 1500 Eggs with a chance to win prizes!  You must be 21 or older to participate, and the number of eggs you will be allowed to find will depend on the number of people who show up.  This is a really fun an unique event that gets bigger and bigger every year, so get out to Millville and find those eggs!

What was the first beer you brewed, and how was it?

It was an Amber Ale kit from Northern Brewer. I had been out in Colorado and had a New Belgium Fat Tire, and really enjoyed it so I wanted to make something similar. It turned out really good, and it went really fast. It was right after that I brewed a Helles Lager since I just got a refrigerator for the garage to control the fermentation temperature. Initially, it tasted good, but after about 2 months it started getting an onion taste.

What is your favorite style to brew, and why?

It would have to be IPA’S. I am a hop junkie, and have to try IPA’S wherever I go. There are so many ways to change the characteristics of them from the kind of hops, to the time you add them to the boil. It’s just a very dynamic style for something that seems so narrow. I also enjoy a big, heavy, barrel aged Stouts. I’m not really a whiskey guy, but I do enjoy a hint of whiskey in my beer.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Rate Beer, and do they influence your recipes?

I have completely given up on reading those types of sites. For the first 2 years, I read every review on Untappd, and freaked out about a thousand times. If you don’t like a certain style then you can’t give it an educated review. Just because you don’t like a style doesn’t mean it’s a 2 star beer. It’s not just my beers either. When I see other local breweries getting 2 stars I feel angry for them, because I know that beer isn’t a 2. I truly put more stock about our brand from what people say on our Facebook page, at the Taproom, and at festivals. It would definitely be a NO when it comes to them influencing our recipes.

Author’s Note:  I agree with something that Paul said. I too think those types of sites will continue to lose credibility unless they change the rating system.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

We started using Rabbit Hill Farms lately as have a number of local breweries. In the fall when we make our Honey Brown we use local honey, and when the time comes to make something with blueberries, and cranberries we have a local source for that too. One other way we source local is with our glassware. Millville is known for their glass factories, and we would use Gerresheimer Glass Inc. for our growlers until they moved to Chicago. We now get our glassware from Duran Glass in Millville. All of our merchandise is made local, and we try to buy as much equipment local as well.

What is the one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

The answer that was given by Paul was one I heard often,You really need to control your temperature during fermentation. It is extremely difficult to put your wort and yeast into a glass carboy, and not have the temperature spike. If you want to consistently make good beer at home you need to control temperature during fermentation.”

What is the one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery?

Don’t be afraid to start small. We didn’t have the money to start out with a 15 BBL system like we where told. You will need a realistic budget to work off of. We started out only brewing 12 gallons at a time, but if your numbers are right, and you figure out that you can hit those numbers you’ll be okay. You also need to be mechanically inclined so you can fix things on the fly. If you can’t afford something you need to know how to make it cheap.

If there were one beer you could brew with no regard to cost, production, or sales, what would it be?

Without question, it would be barrel aged beers. I would love to brew something, and stick it in a whiskey or wine barrel, and forget about it for 3-4 years. Firestone Walker does this, and I just think it’s so neat.

Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you the most?

We started out brewing mainly IPA’s, but quickly found out that the Millville area had a large dark beer loving colony, so we rapidly switched gears, and started brewing some. We where totally caught off guard by that, but we love making, and drinking them. Judging by the response everyone else likes drinking them too.

Other than your beer, what is your go to after a long day at the brewery?

Usually, it would be Founders All Day IPA, but I do like to enjoy some barrel aged stuff like Bourbon County or KBS. I also got my hand on a couple Founders Backwoods Bastard that I like to enjoy, but mostly All Day IPA. You can have 3-4 and get sloppy.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

Just to continue canning. Hopefully be able to hire another part time or full time person. We would love to add another tank or two, and another fermenter or two. Also, start spreading out a little farther with our distribution zone. See if we can start opening 6-7 days a week. In 5 years we would want to be up to a 10 BBL system, and swap out some of the 7 BBL tanks for 20 BBL tanks. Increase our distribution area to about 2/3rds of the state, and maybe start sneaking into Philly. The ultimate 5 year goal would be to open a Farm Brewery on a piece of land we have our eye on. We would love to do a whole sustainable thing with growing some hops, and barley, and have some animals. We want to make it more of a daytrip for the whole family where you can walk around having a beer while the kids feed the animals spent grains, and learn about the whole brewing process. In the fall we would have a pumpkin patch, and hayrides.

Bonus Question. What’s the best beer you ever had?

That would have to be Firestone Walker’s Stickee Monkee.

Bonus #2. What do you listen to while brewing? I got this idea from Tadhg Campbell of Slack Tide Brewing.

It’s a mix mash of everything. Primarily it’s 80’s  90’s rock, and early 2000 alternative rock. There are a few rap days, and some jazz days thrown in for good measure. If we are canning, and Rage Against the Machine comes on it seems to speed up the process.

Thanks so much to Paul and Jen Simmons of Glasstown Brewing Company for spending some time with me!  They are truly 2 of the nicest people that you will ever meet!

Enjoy Your Pour!

10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Jim Sacco of Vinyl Brewing

In this edition of 10 Questions With…  I headed to Hammonton to do a little follow up to our previous article on the 3rd brewery to open up in town, Vinyl Brewing. I was excited to do this article with Jim Sacco, Co-owner and head brewer of Vinyl because it combines 2 of my favorite things, beer and music. Jim was brewing at Three 3’s Brewing Company when he decided it was time to go out on his own. So in January 2017 Jim, along with his Aunt and Uncle Susan and Tom Puentes,  started on the journey to make beautiful beer and music together. As I walked in the door I found a spacious and comfortable tap room with booths, tables, and a large U shaped bar. The walls are adorned with all kinds of music memorabilia, and there is plenty of space for the many patrons that have visited since opening in late September. Located in Downtown Hammonton on Main Street and surrounded by an abundance of dining choices,  everyone can find something to pair with their ever-rotating tap list. Do your taste buds a favor and add Vinyl Brewing to your list when coming to Hammonton.

Jim is dropping two new beers this week.  First is Speed Freak, a spelt IPA brewed with Mosaic, Simcoe, and Amarillo hops and Out of Your Element, a Rye Porter.  Vinyl is a great place to stop by and have a beer or two in Downtown Hammonton which is now being referred to as the “Brewmuda Triangle” as a homage to it being the first town in South Jersey with three operating breweries  (Hackettstown also has 3 breweries in North Jersey).  Vinyl, along with Tomfoolery and Three 3’s, are in close proximity to each other and they have a great spirit of camaraderie and a love of their town which really comes through when you talk to anyone at any of these fine breweries.

What was the first beer you brewed and how was it?

It was an extract stout kit I brewed with a couple of buddies in my parent’s kitchen about 12 years ago. We did it on an electric stovetop and it took over 3 hours to bring to a boil. We thought it was really good, but looking back now, it was just terrible. But it was cool at the time.

What is your favorite style to brew and why?

It would have to be IPAs. There is so much you can do with the different malt and hop profiles, and adding fruit. You can really differentiate the IPAs by the different hops you use. I’m more of an east coast style drinker and brewer.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Tate Beer and, if you do, does it influence your recipes?

I do look at them. I think it’s cool to see what people are thinking, but I don’t want to put too much stock into it. Ultimately everyone likes something different, and who am I to get mad at someone who doesn’t like something I brew? I like to make beer that I like to enjoy and hope people will enjoy it, too. It definitely does not influence my recipes.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

I like to use local ingredients as much as I can. The beer I actually brewed today I used whole leaf hops from Timberline Farms in Folsom. The honey porter I made is from honey I got from a family friend’s farm just a mile down the road. I was also in Cape May and purchased some Cape May sea salt for a Gose I’m going to make. My family owns a sweet potato and a blueberry farm which I just made a sweet potato beer out of. And of course, we are the blueberry capital of the world.

What is the one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

Concentrate on your fermentation temperature, and also make sure you’re pitching enough yeast. I think if you lock those 2 things in, you’re going to make your beer 10 times better. Get a refrigerator and convert it and put a temperature control on it, and your beer will be so much better.

What is one piece of advice you would give someone who wants to open a brewery?

Definitely be patient. You will have to pay rent on a building that you can’t use for months, but everyone has to do it. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and it pays off. It’s hard work and it’s stressful, but just bear with it, because in the end you’ll be thankful you stuck around. If it’s your passion, it will all be worth it.

If there was a beer that you could brew with no regards to cost, production, or sales, what would it be and what?

Barrel aged sours, which we are going to start doing soon. Sour ales are my first love along with IPAs. The cost factor involved would be in the time it takes because you are waiting months and months for it to be ready.

Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you the most?

The sheer amount of people that have come out, and the amount of beer we have gone through. The amount of support from the public and the brewery community has surpassed our expectations. We are extremely thankful for all the support.

Other than your beer, what is your go-to after a long day at the brewery?

Anything local. I like to go home and unwind with stuff from Bolero Snort. I really like the stuff in cans they have been putting out. I also like to have a good stock of Tired Hands Brewery at home, also. And sometimes I’ll just walk down the street to Tomfoolery and have a few beers.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

In a year I hope we are reaching the point of expanding with a few more fermenter and start doing some bottle releases. In 5 years I hope to have taken over this whole building. I would love to go up to a 15 BBL system with some 30 BBL fermenters, and really start to push our distribution into Philly and New York.

Bonus Question: What is your favorite beer that you have ever had?

I’ll have to give you two. The first one is Mago Tago from Tired Hands. The next one, and probably my favorite of all time is Pliny the Elder. I just think that’s the best representation of that style of beer, and I don’t think anyone has come close to it.

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