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10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Paul Simmons of Glasstown Brewing Company

Back in January when I sat down with Paul and Jen Simmons to talk about their upcoming 4 year anniversary I also did a “10 Questions with the Brewer” segment.  Paul is a really great guy and we talked for well over an hour, and I could have talked to him for another 10 more!  These articles are one of my favorite things we do here at South Jersey Beer Scene and Paul’s was no exception!  We get a lot of similar answers, but how they each got there is often times very different.  Glasstown will be having its 5th Annual Adult Easter Egg Hunt at the brewery on 3/31 at 11:45 AM.  Paul, Jen, and the rest of the staff at Glasstown hide 1500 Eggs with a chance to win prizes!  You must be 21 or older to participate, and the number of eggs you will be allowed to find will depend on the number of people who show up.  This is a really fun an unique event that gets bigger and bigger every year, so get out to Millville and find those eggs!

What was the first beer you brewed, and how was it?

It was an Amber Ale kit from Northern Brewer. I had been out in Colorado and had a New Belgium Fat Tire, and really enjoyed it so I wanted to make something similar. It turned out really good, and it went really fast. It was right after that I brewed a Helles Lager since I just got a refrigerator for the garage to control the fermentation temperature. Initially, it tasted good, but after about 2 months it started getting an onion taste.

What is your favorite style to brew, and why?

It would have to be IPA’S. I am a hop junkie, and have to try IPA’S wherever I go. There are so many ways to change the characteristics of them from the kind of hops, to the time you add them to the boil. It’s just a very dynamic style for something that seems so narrow. I also enjoy a big, heavy, barrel aged Stouts. I’m not really a whiskey guy, but I do enjoy a hint of whiskey in my beer.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Rate Beer, and do they influence your recipes?

I have completely given up on reading those types of sites. For the first 2 years, I read every review on Untappd, and freaked out about a thousand times. If you don’t like a certain style then you can’t give it an educated review. Just because you don’t like a style doesn’t mean it’s a 2 star beer. It’s not just my beers either. When I see other local breweries getting 2 stars I feel angry for them, because I know that beer isn’t a 2. I truly put more stock about our brand from what people say on our Facebook page, at the Taproom, and at festivals. It would definitely be a NO when it comes to them influencing our recipes.

Author’s Note:  I agree with something that Paul said. I too think those types of sites will continue to lose credibility unless they change the rating system.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

We started using Rabbit Hill Farms lately as have a number of local breweries. In the fall when we make our Honey Brown we use local honey, and when the time comes to make something with blueberries, and cranberries we have a local source for that too. One other way we source local is with our glassware. Millville is known for their glass factories, and we would use Gerresheimer Glass Inc. for our growlers until they moved to Chicago. We now get our glassware from Duran Glass in Millville. All of our merchandise is made local, and we try to buy as much equipment local as well.

What is the one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

The answer that was given by Paul was one I heard often,You really need to control your temperature during fermentation. It is extremely difficult to put your wort and yeast into a glass carboy, and not have the temperature spike. If you want to consistently make good beer at home you need to control temperature during fermentation.”

What is the one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery?

Don’t be afraid to start small. We didn’t have the money to start out with a 15 BBL system like we where told. You will need a realistic budget to work off of. We started out only brewing 12 gallons at a time, but if your numbers are right, and you figure out that you can hit those numbers you’ll be okay. You also need to be mechanically inclined so you can fix things on the fly. If you can’t afford something you need to know how to make it cheap.

If there were one beer you could brew with no regard to cost, production, or sales, what would it be?

Without question, it would be barrel aged beers. I would love to brew something, and stick it in a whiskey or wine barrel, and forget about it for 3-4 years. Firestone Walker does this, and I just think it’s so neat.

Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you the most?

We started out brewing mainly IPA’s, but quickly found out that the Millville area had a large dark beer loving colony, so we rapidly switched gears, and started brewing some. We where totally caught off guard by that, but we love making, and drinking them. Judging by the response everyone else likes drinking them too.

Other than your beer, what is your go to after a long day at the brewery?

Usually, it would be Founders All Day IPA, but I do like to enjoy some barrel aged stuff like Bourbon County or KBS. I also got my hand on a couple Founders Backwoods Bastard that I like to enjoy, but mostly All Day IPA. You can have 3-4 and get sloppy.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

Just to continue canning. Hopefully be able to hire another part time or full time person. We would love to add another tank or two, and another fermenter or two. Also, start spreading out a little farther with our distribution zone. See if we can start opening 6-7 days a week. In 5 years we would want to be up to a 10 BBL system, and swap out some of the 7 BBL tanks for 20 BBL tanks. Increase our distribution area to about 2/3rds of the state, and maybe start sneaking into Philly. The ultimate 5 year goal would be to open a Farm Brewery on a piece of land we have our eye on. We would love to do a whole sustainable thing with growing some hops, and barley, and have some animals. We want to make it more of a daytrip for the whole family where you can walk around having a beer while the kids feed the animals spent grains, and learn about the whole brewing process. In the fall we would have a pumpkin patch, and hayrides.

Bonus Question. What’s the best beer you ever had?

That would have to be Firestone Walker’s Stickee Monkee.

Bonus #2. What do you listen to while brewing? I got this idea from Tadhg Campbell of Slack Tide Brewing.

It’s a mix mash of everything. Primarily it’s 80’s  90’s rock, and early 2000 alternative rock. There are a few rap days, and some jazz days thrown in for good measure. If we are canning, and Rage Against the Machine comes on it seems to speed up the process.

Thanks so much to Paul and Jen Simmons of Glasstown Brewing Company for spending some time with me!  They are truly 2 of the nicest people that you will ever meet!

Enjoy Your Pour!

10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Jim Sacco of Vinyl Brewing

In this edition of 10 Questions With…  I headed to Hammonton to do a little follow up to our previous article on the 3rd brewery to open up in town, Vinyl Brewing. I was excited to do this article with Jim Sacco, Co-owner and head brewer of Vinyl because it combines 2 of my favorite things, beer and music. Jim was brewing at Three 3’s Brewing Company when he decided it was time to go out on his own. So in January 2017 Jim, along with his Aunt and Uncle Susan and Tom Puentes,  started on the journey to make beautiful beer and music together. As I walked in the door I found a spacious and comfortable tap room with booths, tables, and a large U shaped bar. The walls are adorned with all kinds of music memorabilia, and there is plenty of space for the many patrons that have visited since opening in late September. Located in Downtown Hammonton on Main Street and surrounded by an abundance of dining choices,  everyone can find something to pair with their ever-rotating tap list. Do your taste buds a favor and add Vinyl Brewing to your list when coming to Hammonton.

Jim is dropping two new beers this week.  First is Speed Freak, a spelt IPA brewed with Mosaic, Simcoe, and Amarillo hops and Out of Your Element, a Rye Porter.  Vinyl is a great place to stop by and have a beer or two in Downtown Hammonton which is now being referred to as the “Brewmuda Triangle” as a homage to it being the first town in South Jersey with three operating breweries  (Hackettstown also has 3 breweries in North Jersey).  Vinyl, along with Tomfoolery and Three 3’s, are in close proximity to each other and they have a great spirit of camaraderie and a love of their town which really comes through when you talk to anyone at any of these fine breweries.

What was the first beer you brewed and how was it?

It was an extract stout kit I brewed with a couple of buddies in my parent’s kitchen about 12 years ago. We did it on an electric stovetop and it took over 3 hours to bring to a boil. We thought it was really good, but looking back now, it was just terrible. But it was cool at the time.

What is your favorite style to brew and why?

It would have to be IPAs. There is so much you can do with the different malt and hop profiles, and adding fruit. You can really differentiate the IPAs by the different hops you use. I’m more of an east coast style drinker and brewer.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Tate Beer and, if you do, does it influence your recipes?

I do look at them. I think it’s cool to see what people are thinking, but I don’t want to put too much stock into it. Ultimately everyone likes something different, and who am I to get mad at someone who doesn’t like something I brew? I like to make beer that I like to enjoy and hope people will enjoy it, too. It definitely does not influence my recipes.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

I like to use local ingredients as much as I can. The beer I actually brewed today I used whole leaf hops from Timberline Farms in Folsom. The honey porter I made is from honey I got from a family friend’s farm just a mile down the road. I was also in Cape May and purchased some Cape May sea salt for a Gose I’m going to make. My family owns a sweet potato and a blueberry farm which I just made a sweet potato beer out of. And of course, we are the blueberry capital of the world.

What is the one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

Concentrate on your fermentation temperature, and also make sure you’re pitching enough yeast. I think if you lock those 2 things in, you’re going to make your beer 10 times better. Get a refrigerator and convert it and put a temperature control on it, and your beer will be so much better.

What is one piece of advice you would give someone who wants to open a brewery?

Definitely be patient. You will have to pay rent on a building that you can’t use for months, but everyone has to do it. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and it pays off. It’s hard work and it’s stressful, but just bear with it, because in the end you’ll be thankful you stuck around. If it’s your passion, it will all be worth it.

If there was a beer that you could brew with no regards to cost, production, or sales, what would it be and what?

Barrel aged sours, which we are going to start doing soon. Sour ales are my first love along with IPAs. The cost factor involved would be in the time it takes because you are waiting months and months for it to be ready.

Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you the most?

The sheer amount of people that have come out, and the amount of beer we have gone through. The amount of support from the public and the brewery community has surpassed our expectations. We are extremely thankful for all the support.

Other than your beer, what is your go-to after a long day at the brewery?

Anything local. I like to go home and unwind with stuff from Bolero Snort. I really like the stuff in cans they have been putting out. I also like to have a good stock of Tired Hands Brewery at home, also. And sometimes I’ll just walk down the street to Tomfoolery and have a few beers.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

In a year I hope we are reaching the point of expanding with a few more fermenter and start doing some bottle releases. In 5 years I hope to have taken over this whole building. I would love to go up to a 15 BBL system with some 30 BBL fermenters, and really start to push our distribution into Philly and New York.

Bonus Question: What is your favorite beer that you have ever had?

I’ll have to give you two. The first one is Mago Tago from Tired Hands. The next one, and probably my favorite of all time is Pliny the Elder. I just think that’s the best representation of that style of beer, and I don’t think anyone has come close to it.

Follow Vinyl Brewing on Social Media!

Facebook:  @vinylbrewing

Twitter:  @vinylbrewing

Instagram: vinylbrewing

On the Web:  www.vinylbrewingnj.com

 

 

 

 

 

10 Questions With... Beer Biz Profiles Breweries

10 Questions With…Donn Hoosack of ManaFirkin Brewing Company!

“I love the smell of malt in the morning…or in the afternoon or evening!” (apologies to Robert Duvall and Francis Ford Coppola). That was the delicious aroma that hit me as soon as I entered the doors of Manafirkin Brewing Company, as the newest brew, a Belgian Tripel was circulating through the chiller and being transferred to the fermenter.  Located in Manahawkin, the brewery opened its doors on May 19 and has quickly become a local favorite. The name is a combination of the town and a firkin. What is a firkin?  A firkin is a unit of measure and also the size of a particular kind of keg used for cask conditioning; one-quarter of a barrel, 72 pints, 9 imperial gallons. Firkins can be wooden or metal.

Manafirkin is a 3 headed beast with Donn Hoosack serving as Head Brewer and Co-Founder, joined by fellow “Firkin Founders” Todd Hunt and Mick Committee.  Donn had been a passionate home brewer for  11 or 12 years and, over time, expanded his system to the point where he was preparing to turn his garage into a production facility. The 3 friends got together and thought if we are going to do it, let’s go all the way and began doing the legwork on a warehouse location open to the public. Donn knew the brewing end, Todd is the owner of Shore Good Donuts on LBI, so he knew the business end and Mick was in charge of the legal and permit legwork.

Image By ManaFirkin Brewing Co

“We were always set on Manahawkin as our home base. We all live here, our kids are growing up here, so we really wanted to be part of this community. If we didn’t do it here, we wouldn’t do it anywhere, so it would be back to the garage for us.”, said Donn in a conversation we had over a couple of pints of “Wake the Firk Up” Oatmeal Stout, one of their flagship brews.  “This was truly a family project, as wives, moms, dads, kids, everyone was involved in the design, construction and set up”, Donn continued. The family atmosphere is still present as all hands are on deck for tap room days, including wives Lisa, Michelle and Heather, other family members and the friendly bar and brew staff. The large firehouse bell hanging over the taps is a formidable presence, so order the right beer, guess the right number, or give a good tip and maybe you’ll get a ring!  I was there on the Belgian Tripel day so while newest ‘Firkin family member, Assistant Brewer, John Starner, was supervising the transfer, I had the opportunity to ask our “10 Questions With…” to Donn.

What was the first beer you brewed?

First was a Magic Hat #9 clone, the second was the Chamomile wheat, (which you can see is on the tap list in a similar incarnation as Good KARMAmile, a pale wheat ale). Dogfish IPA clone was an early recipe, which really brings us full circle, as one of their brewers at the time, Chris, who is now at Crooked Hammock was a great resource when we were setting up.

What is your favorite style to brew and why?

IPAs…I just love the variety of hops and how you can use them when you are brewing an IPA.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, Rate Beer and if you do how does it influence your recipes?

I do, but I really pay most attention to Facebook ratings. I like to listen to my customers and brew the beers they like. We have 17 beers on tap, which some may say is a lot, but I want to give our patrons variety…I know that everyone will walk away with at least one that they love. I also like to be creative, offer something new, so at least 1x per week, we are brewing something we’ve never served before. 

How do you stay connected to the local area?

Our spent grain goes to a local farm (on cue the local farmer came in to pick up a couple of cans). We also just got a couple of barrels from Laird’s Apple Farm, so we will be starting some barrel projects in the brewhouse.

What is the one tip you would give to home brewers to make better beer?

The secret ingredient…water! Water treatment is the last thing a home brewer grasps. It took me a while, but the water profile makes such a difference!

What is the one piece of advice you would give to someone who wants to open a brewery?

Have a good partner! It’s hard to do it alone, so being able to share responsibilities really helps to lighten the load! Also, make sure you really settle on an established site and all of your administrative ducks in a row.  Once you have a site, you have to start paying the lease, so the sooner you can start producing, the better.

If there were a beer that you could brew, with no regard to cost, production or sales, what would it be?

Dogfish Head Worldwide Stout! Dark, rich, complex…so much flavor!

Looking back on opening day forward, what was the one thing that surprised you the most?

From a business standpoint, we have exceeded all projection, so we are thrilled if not surprised at that. Our biggest surprise is that the Kalsch Kölsch is still one of our top sellers, number 3, in fact. In this world of IPA popularity, that is a great surprise.

Other than your beer, what is your “go to” drink after a long day at the brewery?

I like local brews, and my go-to is  “We Want the Gold” from Icarus in Lakewood. All of their beers are excellent and this one is a NEIPA.  I also like Weyerbacher’s Imperial Stout “Tiny”.

Where do you see the brewery in 1 year? 5 years?

We have a 5-year lease, so our plans are to continue to upgrade our production, recipes and grow here in our hometown. We have discussed alternative methods of getting our product out there like crowlers, etc. but nothing definite yet.

Bonus question…Donn..Why no Big Beard?

Can’t grow one…I’m like Mr. Bigglesworth!

Follow ManaFirkin Brewing Co on Social Media!

Facebook   @ManaFirkinBrewing

Instagram  @manafirkin_brewing_company

10 Questions With... Beer Biz Profiles Breweries

10 Questions With…Tadhg Campbell of Slack Tide Brewing Company

In this edition of 10 Questions With… I headed to Clermont, N.J. to talk to head brewer Tadhg Campbell of one of my favorites, Slack Tide Brewing Company.  Tadhg and his brother Jason opened up Slack Tide in December of 2015 with the intention of making high-quality beer from locally sourced ingredients whenever possible. The Campbell brothers started brewing in their garages about 7 years ago. While the first couple batches were made from extract kits, they quickly moved to all grain where you have more control over the final product. The first year or so was rough, but with a great response from family, and friends they started thinking that they may want to make this more than just a hobby. So they brewed up 6 batches (most are still brewed today) bottled them up and gave them out to 48 people with an anonymous rating sheet in self-addressed envelopes. The response was extremely favorable. One of the 48 was actually a certified beer judge who got a couple of his judging buddies to taste the samples as well, and filled out a more detailed score sheet. The response was also very good, so they asked if he thought they should open a brewery which the beer judge replied, “I would”. So with Tadhg as head brewer, and Jason bringing his brewing knowledge and project management background in which he is very meticulous with the paperwork, things started to come together. Now you add Jason’s wife, Bobbie, with her marketing background, and Tadhg’s wife, Natacha, with her clothing background you have a great recipe for a successful business to go along with the great beer recipes. I highly recommend a trip to Slack Tide to get “unstressed”.

What was the first beer you brewed, and how was it?

It was an extract kit called Dead Ringer IPA. It turned out as well as could be expected for the first time. It was drinkable, but not delicious by any means. Not sure if we did the recipe justice, but we drank it, and thought it was the coolest thing ever.

What is your favorite style to brew, and why?

That’s a tough one. We try to brew many styles here. I know some brewers may be hesitant to say it, but I’m going to have to say an IPA. It’s the most popular and sought-after style, and there are so many variations of it. The New England style is really popular and is a little more difficult to hit the target then the West Coast IPA.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate, or Rate Beer, and if you do, does it influence your recipes?

It would be silly not to, but I wouldn’t say we look at them too much. The feedback we like, and enjoy, and take into account the most is the face to face contact-Whether it’s in the Taproom, or at a festival, or just out in public. We also trust the other local brewer’s opinions and do the same for them. It definitely does not affect our recipes.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

It’s a big part of what we do here. Since we do live in the Garden State it’s nice to see farmers like Bad Cat Farms, and Rabbit Hill Farms starting to grow hops and malts. We brew with fruit from Hammonton, and sweet potatoes from Vineland, and Aronia berries that are harvested right down the street. What we do is local, and you always have to pay it forward local with the farmers whether it’s honey, fruit, vegetables, or even oysters.

What is the one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

When Jason and I started brewing in the garage we felt our beer quality took a huge step when we got a temperature controlled fermentation box. Dialing in the temperature made our beer more consistent, and a true reflection of what you got.

What is one piece of advice you would give someone who wants to open a brewery?

Do your homework! Be prepared to wait for a lot of the permits. The number one piece of advice is to calculate how much time you’ll need to spend at the brewery, and then double or triple that. Brewing is 90% cleaning and sterilizing.

If there was a beer that you could brew with no regards to cost, production, or sales what would it be?

I knew this question was coming, and I was debating on a few. I would have to say a big barrel aged Stout or Barleywine. The amount of time would be the expense, not so much the ingredients.

Looking back to opening day forward, what was the one thing that happened that surprised you the most?

I would have to say the way the community embraced us. Not just the customers who are some of the best, but the other local breweries as well. We all work hard, we all drink beer, and we all have fun. It’s just a great fraternity of people, and we all want each other to succeed.

Other than your beer, what is your go-to after a long day at the brewery?

Most of the time it would be a cold glass of water, but if not that it would definitely be something from a local brewery.

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

We are currently installing a 10 BBL system which is almost complete. It’s going to take a lot of outside work in sales, but we want to have it maxed out. Maybe tweak the Taproom hours. In 5 years we want to be canning a lot so we can get into the package good stores. Hopefully another expansion, and continue to grow organically.

Bonus Question: What is your favorite beer, other than yours?

The most memorable beer would be Red Dog. (laugh) When I played football in college the 1st team was the blue team, the 2nd team was the white team, and the 3rd team was the red team. Since I was a freshman I was on the red team, and we called ourselves The Red Dogs and drank a lot of Red Dog. Probably because it was like $5 a case. This is a hard question because I like different beers in different seasons. The answer would be Firestone Walker Brewing’s Wookey Jack, which is not in production anymore. It was actually the inspiration for our Knockdown Black IPA which took home the bronze medal at the Best Of Craft Beer Awards in Bend, Oregon.

10 Questions With... Breweries

10 Questions With…Torie Fisher, Owner, Backward Flag Brewing Company of Forked River

Staff Sergeant Torie Fisher was nearing the end of her military career and was looking to do something different. After 2 tours of duty in Iraq, deployed in 2004 and 2008, she proudly served her country but knew it was time for a change.  So Torie, being a home brewer, decided to combine her love of the craft with the love of her veteran community and the idea of Backward Flag was born. “I knew from the beginning that our brand would be geared towards veterans and law enforcement,” Torie said as we spoke at the brew house over a glass of Mission Continues, a limited edition Black Ale made with saffron.

Brewery Manger Jeff , Torie, and Head Brewer Melinda of Backward Flag Brewing Company

The ale is really a microcosm of the mission statement and vision for Backward Flag. The brew is named for Mission Continues, an organization that assists returning veterans in adjusting to life at home. The saffron is from Afghanistan and is supplied by a company called Rumi Spice, which was founded and is run by veterans of Afghanistan who fell in love with the country and wanted to give back. Other ingredients are Counterstrike Coffee and Micacao chocolate tea made from the shells of the cacao bean, again both veteran owned companies. And 50% of the profits from Mission Continues goes to non-profit veteran organizations.

Torie’s original plan was to open a brew pub, however, with no restaurant experience, she thought that wasn’t realistic, so she decided a brewery was a better option. She still worked at the Lakehurst Joint Base and wanted to remain nearby so she looked at various locations throughout Ocean County.
While bringing her daughter to a day care location in Lacey, she happened upon the perfect property right across the street and that Challenger Way location became Backward Flag Brewing Company.
Torie has held true to her initial commitment and Backward Flag is the site of many benefits and fundraisers to support our military and law enforcement community. Her nonprofit agency, Arms2artisans, will be up and running in January 2018.

Here are our 10 questions for Torie:

What was the first beer you brewed and how was it?

Stone Brewery Smoked Porter. It was awful… All smoke, no porter!

What is your favorite style to brew and why?

Stouts…my favorite beer to drink and as a brewer there is a lot of flexibility.

Do you look at ratings on Untapped, Beer Advocate or Rate Beer and, if you do, does it influence your recipes?

No….and Yes…We brew what we like to drink and if it sells that means the customer likes it. We do look at Untapped, etc for trends and quality control, is our beer under carbonated, too sweet, etc.

How do you stay connected to the local area in relation to sourcing ingredients?

We try to work with a lot of businesses owned and operated by our veteran and law enforcement partners, which goes along with our mission statement. The Mission Continues black ale is an example of that. We also do work with The Fir Farm in Colts Neck for some of our hops and Rabbit Hill Farms in Shiloh is a maltster we could possibly be working with in the future.

What is one tip you would give home brewers to make better beer?

Source your information from books and other resource sites. You’ll learn so much more than trying to do it on your own.

What is one piece of advice you would give someone who wants to open a brewery?

Decide whether you want to work in a brewery or own a brewery. If you are an owner your brewing days are numbered. An owner has 20 different people that need your attention and help. I still write most of the recipes, but without my head brewer, Melinda Gulsever (National Guard and Black Hawk engine mechanic), we wouldn’t be able to produce what we do.

If there was a beer you could brew without regards to cost, production or sales, what would it be and why?

You’re drinking it now. Mission Continues is what I look for in a brew. It’s complex, delicious, most of the ingredients are from veteran owned companies and 50% of the profits go to veteran owned organizations.

Looking back from opening day forward, what was the one thing that surprised you most?

How quickly things can change! I started with 2 partners who were involved in the operation, now I have 2 new partners who mostly provide financial resources for the company. I am also surprised at how quickly we’ve grown.

Other than your beer, what is your “go to” after a long day at the brewery?

Left Hand Milk Stout on nitro. Creamy and delicious!

Where do you see the brewery in a year? In 5 years?

We are excited that our new brew system will be here in October which will more than double our production to 10 barrels. In one year we hope to be able to meet the demand that comes with that expansion. We don’t really want to grow much more than that, so our future focus will be on social issues affecting our veterans and helping them as they transition to civilian life.

Visit Backward Flag Brewing Company on the web at www.backwardflagbrewing.com

Facebook @backwardflagbrewing

Instagram backwardflagbrewing

Twitter @BackwardFlag

 

Editor’s Note-Backward Flag Brewing Company will be celebrating their 2nd Anniversary on Saturday, September 16th at the brewery.  There will be special casks on tap as well as music, and a food vendor outside the licensed premises.  Also, Backward Flag will be presenting certificates and checks to the charity organizations they raised money for.  Congrats to everyone at Backward Flag on this milestone!