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Tom Spends A Day With Brewer Tadhg Campbell of Slack Tide Brewing Company

We have been sitting on this article for quite some time.  Not because it wasn’t done well, we just wanted to hold onto it until Slack Tide Brewing Company was ready to release their first run of cans.  While we were awaiting the boys to let us know, something very cool happened, they went out and one a Bronze Medal at The Great American Beer Festival for Avalon Amber Ale!  So as this article goes to press their cans of Angry Osprey, Bell Buoy, and Tipsy Dipsy are available in 12 oz 6 packs at the brewery and select locations around South Jersey.  Without further adieu, here is Tom’s article born of sweat and hard work while yours truly sat in air conditioning!

John Couchoud, Editor-In-Chief

A Day With The Brewer

I recently spent a couple days with Tadhg Campbell of Slack Tide Brewing Company  to experience what a brew day consists of. The first day started with cleaning and sanitizing the equipment that will be used for the day. On day one Tadhg and assistant brewer Shawn Karge were going to be brewing a BBL batch one of mine and my wife’s favorite, Avalon Amber Ale. Apparently we are not the only ones who think that.3   This beer just took home the Bronze in the American-Style Amber/Red category for the Avalon at the Great American Beer Festival. Tadhg mentioned to me that it’s not a popular style, but I don’t understand why. It has beautiful color, and a nice toasty, malty flavor. For this batch we milled 110 lbs of base grain, and another 90lbs of specialty malt grains. While the grains did their thing in the Mash Tun we started cleaning kegs, and getting things set up to transfer Sand Spike Session IPA from the fermenter to the Brite tank. While the Sand Spike transfer was taking place I was able to clean 12 half kegs and 19 sixtels in their Keg Commander cleaner. We will be filling those the next day with Sand Spike, their Session IPA. My first day was only about 3 hours, but it was a great warm-up for what was to come on day 2.

Day 2 started out at a balmy 86 degrees in the brew house at 6am. That day Tadhg and assistant brewer Chuck Wieland were going to be brewing a double 10 BBL batch of Bell Buoy,  their award wining Belgian Blonde .  The grain bill for each batch will be a little over 700 lbs. While the first batch of Bell Buoy was in the Mash Tun we started kegging the delicious Sand Spike out of the Brite Tank which yielded 12 half kegs, and 19 sixtels which I had cleaned yesterday. By 8:30 we had the first 10 BBL batch of Bell Buoy in the Brew Kettle and all of the Sand Spike in kegs.  It is balmy in the brew house, currently in the low 90’s, thankfully the cloud cover is saving us. As I thought about the process of brewing, the one word that keeps popping into my head is “multitasking”. As Forrest Gump said “There’s always something to do and somewhere to go”. It’s 9 am, and we start to sanitize the 20 BBL fermenter that housed Sand Spike the day before, and will be the new home for the double batch of Bell Buoy for a couple of weeks. At around 10 am we add the hop bill to the first batch of Bell Buoy and start to pull out the spent grains from the Mash Tun which will be picked up by a local farmer to feed his livestock. I also took some of the spent grain and made a batch of chocolate chip cookies with them that turned out really good (Editor’s Note:  They were good!). The sun is out, and it’s about 100 degrees inside the metal building which houses the brewing operation.  so much for me and my big mouth talking about the cloud cover. As we finished removing the first batch of spent grain, Tadhg started pumping the Bell Buoy through the heat exchanger, and into the freshly sanitized 20 BBL fermenter.

As always there is something to sanitize, and prep for the next stage. It’s like a grain, hops, water, and sanitizing symphony that is kind of special to be a part of. It’s now 11:25 am and is about 110 degrees in the brew house, Chuck is moving to the taproom, and we are joined by sales representative Jordi Nicolau to finish up the day in the brew house. We are now ready to move the second batch from the Mash Tun to the Brew Kettle, and we are still sanitizing the Brite Tank to get it ready for the next batch of liquid gold to go in it. Time check is now 12:45 pm, and I just pulled out the second batch of grain from the Mash which comes in at about 1800 lbs when saturated, and the second batch is boiling. Although Tadhg’s day is far from over I’m ready to taste test some of the Sand Spike we kegged, and grab a few crowlers for the 4th. I can’t thank Tadhg, and his brother Jason, and everyone at Slack Tide that I worked with over the 2 days. It was an awesome experience, and it was hot, and hard work, but if you love what you do you never work a day in your life. I can’t wait to do this at another brewery, and have another great experience.

And, as always, Enjoy Your Pour!

                                       

Beer 101 Beer Biz Profiles Breweries

Beerworld! A Short History of Ponderlodge Golf Course and It’s Beer Connection!

Beerworld: A History

Deep in the Cape May County peninsula there was once a lodge on a non-descript golf course referred to as ‘Beerworld’.  Located in Lower Township, this mystical place was born out of the Ponderlodge Golf Course and built by William H. ‘Billy’ Pflaumer shortly after he acquired the land in 1976.

Ponderlodge would shortly be dubbed, Beerworld by locals of Cape May County chiefly because of Billy Pflaumer’s day job: owner of Christian Schmidt & Sons brewery in Philadelphia (more commonly known to many simply as ‘Schmidts’).  Once known as the 9th largest brewer in the country, Schmidts was an American beer icon for decades along with Pabst Blue Ribbon and Anheuser-Busch.

Pflaumer himself did not drink beer or play golf, but built the 16,000-square foot building within Ponderlodge Golf Course for friends and family anyway.  First, as a private 9-hole course and then in 1991, Beerworld was expanded to 18 holes and opened to the public for the first time.  Pflaumer’s family and Lower Township locals alike would play the course up until the crumble of the Schmidts beer empire, and a bankruptcy that would mark a sad end to Beerworld in 1997.  

Schmidt’s Logo Tiled On the Pool

Today, although you can no longer step inside Beerworld for a fresh draft before conquering the back-nine, you can walk the land it once stood on before the lodges’ eventual demolition in 2011.  After Billy Pflaumer lost the golf course in bankruptcy, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection bought the land and made plans to restore it into a wildlife management area (WMA).  

The Cox Hall Creek WMA makes Ponderlodge almost unrecognizable now in 2018.  The golf cart paths are replaced by nature trails.  Ponds once resembling course obstacles have turned into handicap accessible fishing hide-a-ways.  Migratory birds visit the lush grasses and woods that once held drunken golfers cursing a dismal shot in the rough.  

Beerworld is no more, but the lore lives on!  Throw those clubs in the back and let’s find somewhere that still pours a draft!

Cape May Brewing Company

Ah, yes.  New Jersey’s fastest growing craft beer brewer.  Located in the heart of Cape May County and quite literally so close to Ponderlodge/Cox Hall Creek WMA that if golf carts where still on site, one could make the trip to the brewery within five minutes.

Established in 2011, in what could be interpreted as rising from the ruins of Beerworld, the Cape May Brewing Company has gone on to dominate the region since opening its taps to the world.  With a full tasting room, newly renovated outdoor lounge, and nearly two dozen craftsmanship awards from around the globe – Cape May Brewery is a must see, sit, and drink location.

Whether you’re into tastings or pints (I’m a pint guy myself) there’s plenty of brews to try and even more options to take home in the company’s ‘Brewtique’ store (A+ on the creative name convention).  Cape May IPA is the brewery’s flagship beer, and was the very first draft the woman who would go on to become my wife and I tried on a sizzling late summer day in 2012 in a little place called Cabana’s Beach Bar on Beach Avenue in Cape May.  This also happens to be the historic first location Cape May Brewery placed kegs in and sometimes, I like to think we drank a beer from that first keg.  

We were blown away that someone in South Jersey had created an IPA to challenge all IPAs, and even beat out quite a few of our favorites.  On our next visit we went to see this brewery for ourselves and where not disappointed.  Now we find ourselves making the trek down from Camden County as often as summer traffic and hectic schedules allow.

Cape May Brewery has grown a lot since 2011, but you can still purchase as much Cape May IPA as you can carry and so many beers since then.  Coastal Evacuation DIPA is one of my personal favorites while my wife enjoys the taste bud tingle of Corrosion Sour IPA.  

Photo Credit: Cape May Brewing Company

Other flagship beers include Devil’s Reach and Honey Porter.  The latter of the two is made with local honey that is certified Jersey Fresh by the state.  Sign up for the newsletter and check out what’s on tap often from One Off Wednesday’s (week to week one-time brews) to seasonal brews such as Follow The Gull and the much coveted Apple Bomb.

Beer 101 Breweries Podcast

The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast-Episode 18: Rob Mullin of Yuengling!

Rob Mullin from Yuengling is the guest on this week’s episode.  Yuengling just released it’s first new beer in 17 years, Yuengling Golden Pilsner, and Rob brought some for us to sample along with a few of their great legacy beers, Black & Tan and Lord Chesterfield Ale. Yuengling’s story is one of the best in all of the beer industry and is one of the most sought-after brands by both Craft Beer aficionados and everyday beer drinkers.

Beer 101 News Road Trip

Exploring South Jersey with Joe Moore-Lucy the Elephant: A South Jersey Staple

Exploring South Jersey with Joe Moore

Lucy the Elephant:  A South Jersey Staple

Scattered around South Jersey are micro craft breweries that many of us have come to know, love, and even enjoy frequently.  Another lesser-known but equally important aspect of South Jersey is the rich history the lies here.  The premier way to enjoy both magnetic aspects of this beloved region is to mix them.  An example?  

Well… Did you happen to know South Jersey is home to the ‘World’s Greatest Elephant’?  A safe bet might have been wagered that most outsiders and even some lifelong South Jersey residents did not.

Lucy the Elephant 

Originally built as a novelty attraction in 1881, Lucy the Elephant is a unique structure that stands six stories high, and at one time, towered over everything along the Atlantic County coastline.  When first erected by James Lafferty in the late 19th century, Lucy was situated in what was known then as South Atlantic City.  

Outwardly modeled after the Asian elephant, Lucy stands east facing the Atlantic Ocean and has served in the past as a hotel, a personal residence, and among other things, a tavern that nearly caused the structure to burn to the ground due to a visiting drunkard in 1904 (we all know one or two or those).  Lucy continued as the face of Southern New Jersey as she changed hands from various owners until finally being donated to the city of Margate (present-day South Atlantic City) in 1970.  The city, along with a newly formed conservation group dubbed the Commission to Save Lucy, together would face the elephant’s most difficult challenge to date: the physical movement of the entire six-story building.

The city of Margate and the commission decided that the damage from the building sitting so close to the salt water of the Atlantic Ocean while also sitting on prime South Jersey beachfront real estate would serve as Lucy’s end if the pachyderm shaped structure was not moved just over two blocks down the shoreline road to a vacant lot purchased by the Commission to Save Lucy and the city of Margate.  This major engineering feat was completed in under 30 days to relocate Lucy the Elephant to her new home, where she still welcomes tourists and locals today.  

Lucy was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1976 and was converted into a museum where guests can tour the inside of the world’s greatest elephant and enjoy beautiful views of both the Atlantic City skyline and the Atlantic Ocean.  

Seeing this magnificent elephant costs a minor fee of $8 for adults and $4 for children 12 to 3 years old with children under the age of 2 touring for free.  Lucy the Elephant is open all year-round providing limited hours during the winter and spring months and longer touring schedules during the warmer months.  Check out LucytheElephant.org for seasonal touring schedules, for donations to the Save Lucy Commission, and the Lucy Gift shop, which stocks more things elephant than the average could be imaged.  The website dives deeper into the history of Lucy as well as serving as the primary source from which information was gathered for this article.

Atlantic City: In & Out of the Casinos

Whether you tour the inside of Lucy the Elephant, walk beneath the belly of this larger than life structure or merely admire her from the parking lot, there is only one more thing left to do from here: find a cold beer.

Out: The Back Bay Ale House

If you would like to continue your outdoor adventure, then the Back Bay Ale House located in the Gardener’s Basin section of Atlantic City should be the first and only stop.  The Gardener’s Basin section of Atlantic City is the spot locals and tourists without the urge to gamble largely find themselves in. 

Nestled between the Marina District casinos and the world famous Atlantic City Boardwalk, the Back Bay Ale House offers an entirely different vantage point, this time from within Atlantic City, while offering an impressive list of local craft beers including two brews from Flying Fish Brewery; the Back Bay Sunset Ale and the Back Bay 1858, both brewed specifically for the Back Bay Ale House.  The latter of the two was inspired by the year in which the mason jar was created and the beer, as well as all cocktails, come in a 16-ounce mason jar.  Other local craft beers on tap sample from other local breweries such as Cape May Brewing Company’s Cranberry Bog, and Dogfish Head’s flagship 60 Min IPA.

 

In: A Dam Good Sports Bar

If crowds and casinos are more your scene, then there is no other finishing point to an adventure, than A Dam Good Sports Bar located on the third floor of The Quarter in the Tropicana Hotel & Casino, just a short drive from Lucy the Elephant.

It comes as clear convenience that A Dam Good Sports Bar happens to be housed within the casino closest to Lucy, but there it is and offers many delectable craft brews on tap.  Some of the local craft options on tap are Glasstown Brewing Company’s 609 IPA, Ludlam Brewing Company’s Island Big Dirty Double IPA, and Dogfish Head’s 60 Min IPA.  

 

Beer 101

A Millennial’s Beer Journey with Lauren Emerick!

Editors Note-We would like to introduce another woman who will be contributing to the site, Lauren Emerick.  Lauren represents the millennial side of craft beer and will bring her unique take to the site.  She has grown up in an era when there has been a local brewery and a significant amount of craft beer available for her to try without going on a quest to find it!  We look forward to hearing her musings as she enriches her beer knowledge!  Welcome aboard Lauren!

Hi, my name is Lauren Emerick! I’m a South Jersey native and lover of all things craft beer. I grew up in Egg Harbor Township and have lived here most of my life. I got into craft beer right after I turned 21. My first brewery was Cape May Brewing Company in 2011, the first year that they were in business. It has always remained my favorite New Jersey brewery and it’s been awesome to see them evolve to what they are today. They started with a small tap room that had picnic tables to sit at and now it’s so much bigger! My favorite beer from Cape May Brewing Company is definitely the Cape May IPA!  After checking out Cape May Brewery, the hook was set, I couldn’t wait to check out more.

I’m not going to lie, as a girl it used to be a bit intimidating going to breweries but now I feel comfortable going in and knowing what I want to try. I even got my boyfriend to start drinking craft beer and now he enjoys it a lot as well! There can be a stigma that just because you’re a female, you won’t like certain beers or you don’t know what you’re talking about. That’s definitely not true! I’m always posting new beers I try on my Instagram and sharing my thoughts. IPA’s have always been my go-to but I always like to try other styles as well.

Currently, for summer, I’m all about the shandys! A shandy is typically a beer mixed with lemonade or some sort of fruit juice. With a lower ABV, they are very refreshing and great for drinking on the beach.

I love hearing the stories behind the local breweries and enjoying the different vibes at each brewery. We have so many great breweries in South Jersey and each of them are unique in their own way.  While I’ve tried quite a few, there’s still so many to explore and more breweries  are opening in what seems like almost every week. I always recommend doing a tour at a new brewery you stop at, even if it wasn’t mandatory (The State of New Jersey requires that you take a tour prior to enjoying a beer). You’ll hear interesting stories and learn something new each time.I’m excited to contribute to South Jersey Beer Scene because it combines two of my favorite things, writing and craft beer.  I’m also excited to be another female voice in the craft beer industry and share my thoughts!